Illustrated Book of Mormon Commentary – for Teens – Table of Contents

If you are interested, I’ve decided to make things a little easier to navigate. Here is a list of the subjects treated in the Illustrated Book of Mormon Commentary that I’m making for my 16 year old daughter.


Illustrated Book of Mormon for Teens – 1 Nephi – Obtaining the Brass Plates

This is the next installment of my Illustrated Book of Mormon Commentary for Teens project.

These pages are all about the experience of Nephi, Laman, Lemuel and Sam – obtaining the brass plates.

003 Obtaining the Brass Plates part 1

In these pages, I explained to Tiger that there were three basic attempts to obtaining the plates.

The first attempt was rather conventional and arbitrary. Laman, Lemuel, Nephi and Sam decided to go and ask Laban for the plates. The arbitrary aspect – casting lots. I explained that casting lots was a common way to make decisions in ancient times. People felt like the fate of the cast lot was the will of God.

Unfortunately, this attempt was not successful.

The second attempt – to buy the plates – was thoughtful and required a sacrifice. Nephi convinced his brothers to go back to their home, collect all of their goods and try to purchase the plates from Laban.

This was another unsuccessful attempt that also endangered the lives of the sons of Lehi.

004 Obtaining the plates part 2

The third and final attempt was spiritual. Nephi explain that he was led by the Spirit – not knowing beforehand what he would do.

There were a few things I really wanted to illustrate to Tiger:

  1. Laban vs. Nephi – Laban was rich, powerful, and armed. By all accounts, the odds were in Laban’s favor. Of course, these advantages don’t matter in comparison to Nephi’s advantage – he was on the Lord’s errand and was “armed” with the Spirit. In fact, Laban will ironically die by the very sword he probably thought would keep him safe.
  2. Nephi’s ability to make split second decisions. Often, we talk about decision making and we cite the Doctrine and Covenants – study the matter out in our hearts, pray, if we feel good, then it is good. If we feel a stupor of thought, then it is the wrong answer.

    The thing is – there are times when we don’t have the luxury of time to really “study out” our decisions. Nephi does this, and we see his thought process, but this is all happening in moments.

    The reason why Nephi was able to make these split-second decisions – and they were the right decision – is because he prepared daily to have the companionship of the Spirit.

    There are times when we don’t have much time to make an important decision. I want my teenage daughter to know that she can feel assured with her decisions – even the ones made in an instant – if she is living worth of the Holy Ghost and then following its promptings.


Okay – so that’s this next little installment. I’m amazed at how much I’ve been learning while making this book. Right now, my life is busy (like so many of you, I know). I don’t have much time to work on this book. So, it is what I count as my “scripture study.” I know that it is the best way to spend my time in scripture study. I learn so much, and I feel like it is a valuable way to teach my children.

If you are thinking of doing a project like this, but you feel overwhelmed by the project and lacking on time, then keep in mind a few hints to make it more manageable

  • Start early – I started these projects about 1-2 years before giving it to them. It may sound crazy, but then I can work on a little bit at a time and not feel overwhelmed with the scope of the project.
  • Consider this as your personal scripture study while you are working on it. For this project, especially, I have had to spend a lot of time reading and pondering various points in the Book of Mormon. Though this isn’t conventional “scripture study” time, I’m studying the scriptures, and I’m doing just as Nephi said: “And we talk of Christ, we rejoice in Christ, we preach of Christ, we prophesy of Christ, and we write according to our prophecies, that our children may know to what source they may look for a remission of their sins.” (2 Nephi 25:26, emphasis added).


Illustrated Book of Mormon for Teens – 1 Nephi – Laman, Lemuel, and Nephi

This is a continuation of my Illustrated Book of Mormon for Teens project.

I actually titled this page “Circumstances and Choices”

002 Laman Lemuel and Nephi
Comparing and contrasting are always funs way to learn in the scriptures.

At the beginning of the Book of Mormon, we are introduced to a family … Lehi’s family. Specifically, we read about several interactions between Lehi’s eldest sons – Laman and Lemuel – and his younger son – Nephi. They shared many experiences. All of these sons:

  • are sons of Lehi, the prophet
  • are covenant members of the House of Israel
  • are fleeing Jerusalem
  • Are experiencing afflictions, trials, and blessings in the wilderness
  • are all facing many of the same challenges -like hunger, obtaining the plates, living in the desert, building a boat

So – they actually have plenty in common.

Despite these similar circumstances, Lehi’s sons make different choices resulting in vastly different outcomes.


The choice:

“And it came to pass that I, Nephi, being exceedingly young, nevertheless being large in stature, and also having great desires to know of the mysteries of God, wherefore, I did cry unto the Lord; and behold he did visit me, and did soften my heart that I did believe all the words which had been spoken by my father; wherefore, I did not rebel against him like unto my brothers.” – 1 Nephi 2:16

Nephi’s desire to know God results in:

  • A visitation from God (through His Spirit)
  • A softened heart
  • Increased faith
  • A new perspective
  • Power
  • Joy
  • The consecration of Nephi’s afflictions for His Gain

Laman and Lemuel

The choice:

“And thus Laman and Lemuel, being the eldest, did murmur against their father. And they did murmurbecause they knew not the dealings of that God who had created them.” – 1 Nephi 2:12

Laman’s and Lemuel’s refusal to know god results in:

  • Murmuring
  • Complaining
  • Violence against Nephi
  • Wickedness and sin
  • Becoming “past feeling”
  • Anger
  • Becoming murderers in their hearts
  • Powerless
  • Their afflictions don’t become a source of joy or growth – instead their afflictions remain hardships


What will YOU choose???


So there you have it – this is basically what I wrote in Tiger’s book – word for word. It isn’t all that personalized, but I think that it teaches a nice lesson. 🙂

And isn’t it crazy to think about – sometimes we want to blame our circumstances for the decisions we make, but Laman, Lemuel, and Nephi are proof that we can be agents to act for ourselves. They are testimonies that WE HAVE THE POWER to decide if our afflictions and difficulties amount to consecration and miracles or into hardness and misery. If we get a handle of who we are – children of a loving God, then we can get a handle on making better choices and having a better life.




Illustrated Book of Mormon for Teens – First Nephi – Tender Mercies

I started this Book of Mormon commentary type of book for my 16 year old daughter before she was 16…with the intent of giving it to her on her 16th birthday. Sometimes life happens, and now she’ll be 17 in less than 6 months. So…I’ve got to get snapping! Better late than never, right.

One of the reasons that this book has taken me so long to get around to making is that I haven’t really known exactly how I want it all to work out.

At first, I was really interested in making a book that is almost like a commentary – explaining the Book of Mormon as much as a possibly can. You will see this in my pages that are about 1 Nephi. Since then, I have actually figured out the “vision” of this book.

Instead of making a book that is a commentary or tells all that I know about the Book of Mormon, I’m taking a few of the stories and concepts from each book and then writing what I feel inspired to write to my daughter who is in her late teens. So – it won’t be like a commentary. Instead, it will be something much better – a book of insights and advice that is really cute so it doesn’t look like insights and advice! Haha!

Here is my update on 1st Nephi.

1 Nephi Tender Mercies
1 Nephi – The Tender Mercies of the Lord

The Tender Mercies of the Lord

For a long time I have considered 1 Nephi 1:20 to be the central “thesis” of Nephi.

And when the Jews heard these things they were angry with him; yea, even as with the prophets of old, whom they had cast out, and stoned, and slain; and they also sought his life, that they might take it away. But behold, I, Nephi, will show unto you that the tender mercies of the Lord are over all those whom he hath chosen, because of their faith, to make them mighty even unto the power of deliverance. – 1 Nephi 1:20


I love this scripture, and I thought that it was a very important concept for my 16 year old daughter to know and understand.

The Tender Mercies of the Lord

I think that I speak for many Mormons, when I say that Elder Bednar really reinforced the beauty of Nephi’s testimony. In fact, since Elder Bednar’s talk the term “tender mercy” has become a Momron buzzword. So, I included a few quote from Elder Bednar, too:

“The Lord’s tender mercies are the very personal and individualized blessings, strength, protection, assurances, guidance, loving kindnesses, consolation, support, and spiritual gifts which we receive from and because of and through the Lord Jesus Christ.” – David A. Bednar

I told Tiger that we can feel the tender mercies of our loving Heavenly Father in many ways – we have to be aware and recognize them. I then listed a few of the “tender mercies” our family had recently experienced.

Those whom He hath Chosen

In order to experience the tender mercies of the Lord, we learn in 1 Nephi that we need to be “chosen.” Elder Bednar explains what it means to be chosen of God:

God does not have a list of favorites to which we must hope our names will someday be dded.  He does not limited ‘the chosen’ to a restricted few. Rather it is our hearts, and our aspirations, and our obedience which definitively determines whether we are called as one of God’s chosen.” – David A. Bednar, (emphasis added.)

In order to be chosen of God, we must simply choose Him. Joshua was an example of this – he and his house chose to serve the Lord. This was why Joshua was chosen of God.


And that’s that for this page and concept. Of course, I added some cute little decorations to the page. That’s basically the point. I wish I could say that I’m super original, but I have kind of mined my favorite pinterest and instagram boards for artistic inspiration. If I was selling this, I would stray far from that – but since I’m trying to get this book done in a hurry, and since it is a one of a kind book for my daughter’s personal use, I don’t mind using inspiration from other sources.


Making a book like this? Think about the tender mercies you and your family have experienced. What would resonate with a 16, 17, or 18 year old. What is your testimony of feeling the deliverance that God promises to those whom choose Him? Think about ways that we can show that we choose God – ways to which a child in her late teens may relate.

Book of Mormon for Teens – Timeline and Authors

This is the next installment of my Illustrated Book of Mormon Commentary for Teenagers. You can see the first one here.

Before I really get into the Book of Mormon, itself, I wanted to have a few pages showing the timelines and authors of the Book of Mormon. As I wrote in Tiger’s Book:

“Sometimes when you are reading the Book of Mormon, it can be a little confusing to keep track of what you are reading. There are accounts of things as they happen, flashbacks, and the changing of hands with the records.

Hopefully, this timeline and author chart will help you keep the events and authors of the Book of Mormon straight!”

The timeline – there is a lot to fit onto one page!!!

Several years ago, I did my own “story of the Book of Mormon” project. (You can read about it here.) As a part of this project, I created my own Book of Mormon timeline. I highly suggest this type of project. It really helped me to understand the Book of Mormon.

In any case, here is a copy of the timeline that I created: BoM Timeline (available as a PDF Download).

I also felt like Tiger should understand the authors of the Book of Mormon and the way that the plates were handed down. I found a very handy flowchart of the Book of Mormon Authors online here.

Authors of the Book of Mormon

These two pages are chock-full of information. I didn’t have much space to make anything “cute!” No worries, though. I really think that this information will be helpful.

Finally, I included a quote that I really love about the Book of Mormon:

“Would you like to have emblazoned on your soul an undeniable witness that the Savior descended beneath your sins and that there is no sin, no mortal plight outside the merciful reach of His Atonement – that for each of your struggles He has a remedy of superior healing power? Then read the Book of Mormon.” – Tad R. Callister (emphasis added)

Thanks for letting me share this project with you. I am so excited to actually get into the Book of Mormon now. I’m excited to be able to share my testimony with my daughter in a way that I hope she will be receptive to.  I’ll share more with you later!

Illustrated Book of Mormon Commentary for a Teenager (Part One)

When my oldest daughter turned 12, I made her a special book. (You can read about it here .) – She will be turning 16 in a little over a year, and I’ve decided to start making another book for her. This time, it will be about the Book of Mormon. (In case you’re wondering, I made a book for her when she was 14. I’ll probably post it on here soon).

The Title Page
The Title Page

So, I just started this. I’m using one of my favorite – sketchbooks (although the one I’m using is hardbound rather than wirebound).

Why am I doing this? Is it because I’m crazy? No. I’ve thought a lot about how to teach my children the gospel. I’ve thought about lecturing them – and lectures weren’t particularly helpful in my life. I mean I honestly don’t remember if my parents lectured me. I know that they said stuff to me, but I zoned out very easily as a teenager.

I don’t particularly like lecturing my teens right now, either. It feels boring and pointless. But how do we teach our kids the gospel? How do I teach them the things that I know and understand and what them to know and understand?

In this quest, I’ve been inspired by the words of Nephi:

“And we talk of Christ we rejoice in Christ, we preach of Christ, we prophesy of Christ, and we write according to our prophecies, that our children may know to what source they may look for a remission of their sins.” – 2 Nephi 25:26, emphasis added.

I feel like writing what I want to teach my children is an effective way (for me) to preach to them without seeming preachy! I can write lectures, make them cute and heartfelt, and instead of zoning out – my kids will treasure these lectures. That’s the idea, anyway. It’s not sneaky. I’m just being as wise as a serpent and as harmless as a dove. 🙂

So – this is a Book about the Book of Mormon. I’ve divided it as follows:

  • Title Page
  • Timeline of the Book of Mormon
  • Explanation of the Small and Large Plates and their Authors
  • 1 Nephi
  • 2 Nephi
  • Jacob
  • Enos
  • Jarom
  • Omni
  • Words of Mormon
  • Mosiah
  • Alma
  • Helaman
  • 3 Nephi
  • 4 Nephi
  • Mormon
  • Ether
  • Moroni
  • So – pretty straight forward.

    Title Page

    On this page, I just wrote that the Book of Mormon is another Testament of Jesus Christ. I wrote my hope for her – that she will continue to read the Book of Mormon in her life. I also told her about this book that I’m making for her:

    “This book is a gift to you from me. It’s kind of a “commentary” on the Book of Mormon. I’ve been inspired by Nephi’s words, ‘And we talk of Christ, we rejoice in Christ, we preach of Christ, we prophesy of Christ, and we write according to our prophecies, that our children may know to what source they may look for a remission of their sins.’ (2 Nephi 25:26).

    I want you to know – not only do I want you to know the Book of Mormon for yourself, but I also want you to know my testimony of it.

    I hope that this book will be a blessing to you now and for years to come. Love, Mom.

    So – that’s the beginning of this fun ride. I anticipate that it will take me a little over a year to finish this book. It will require a lot of work and effort, but I’m sure that it will be worth it. Maybe you have a child who could use something like this? Try writing your testimonies and lessons you have learned in the Book of Mormon. I’d love to see what you come up with if you do it, too.

I’m the Canoe


I’ve been trying to figure out an analogy for a few days.

Imagine a canoe. There are people in it. One person is seated toward the front of the canoe, with a paddle. This person is strong. He/she is primarily required to paddle.

There is a person in the back of the canoe. This person is the most experienced of all in the canoe, but not necessarily the strongest, physically. This person is in charge of steering the canoe, and must be able to diplomatically lead the rest of the people in the canoe while directing their little boat.

Though not pictured, imagine that there is a person in the middle of the canoe. This person also has a paddle, but isn’t quite as strong as the person seated in the front, nor is this person as experienced as the paddler in the back of the canoe. The middle-person is learning about canoeing. As far as propelling the canoe goes, he may not be the most important canoe-er, but he is there.

I’ve been thinking about people in a canoe – in terms of family. In thinking about this, the question is, who is the paddler in the bow? In the stern? In the hull?

Well, it’s obvious to me that children are the paddlers in the hull. They are part of this team, they paddle from time to time, they help, but are not of critical importance…yet. They are training and gaining experience for when they will one day sit at the stern or the bow.

So. That leaves us with the person sitting in the front of the canoe and the person in the back. I’ve been wondering, which one am I?

There are days when I feel like I’m steering this ship. You know what I mean. I remember in the movie My Big Fat Greek Wedding, when the mother explains to the daughter:
man is the head

Even though this is funny, and I admit that I can act somewhat “neck-like” at times (without being manipulative, of course!), I don’t know if I’m the one on the back of the canoe. We don’t always move according to my direction. Maybe I’m actually in front.

I’ll also admit that there are days, many days, when I feel like that I’m in the bow. I’m paddling, paddling, and paddling. I wake up, feed the kids, exercise, start homeschool (which is quite a list in and of itself), feed the kids lunch, keep them from fighting/destroying the house/general chaos, throw a load of laundry in, talk to my husband about the business, take the kids to the library, make dinner, … you get the idea. We all do this.

I’ll say that again. We all do this. As in, not only are mothers paddlers, but fathers are, too. I know that my husband has a billion things going on in his life: he has to paddle, paddle, paddle.

I don’t think I’m steering. I’m not sure if I’m the primary paddler either. But I know that I’m something in this little analogy that I’ve got swirling in my head.


Last night, I was feeling a little frustrated. It was Saturday, I had been looking forward to some time just sitting, breathing, and catching up. But, the whole day flashed before my eyes. Nothing particularly bad happened, but my expectations for the day weren’t quite met, and I needed a little encouragement. A little buoying up.

I was thinking and praying about my frustrations of the day when I realized the solution to my analogy. I’m not steering the ship, nor am I powering it forward. I’m not sitting idly in the hull. I’m not any of the oarsmen.

I’m the canoe.

I bear up my family, support them, stabilize them. My role isn’t particularly glorious, neither is it obscure. I’m simultaneously a part of the action yet partially submerged under water.

Sometimes I feel tired and “waterlogged.” And then the question comes to my mind, who ever really takes time to appreciate the boat? I might spring a leak, which causes panic and maybe even a fair amount of cursing. 😉 Despite everything else that is going right, those paddlers in the boat can only see the one small fissure. Of course, that fissure is letting in water, so I can’t blame them. I just wish they could see how often everything goes right.

This line of thinking isn’t necessarily helpful as it usually leads to further temptation – It’s a temptation for me to imagine life without them for a moment. No burden to bear. No dirty feet, no rocking back and forth. No bickering about who is paddling, about who splashed whom. I’m tempted to think of a life other than carrying my people, their needs, their worries, their weight back and forth – all done without much of a thought of that vessel that carried them.

It’s tempting to imagine life in the middle of a peaceful lake, with me just floating aimlessly.

Yet, the truth is, I am the canoe, and when you see a canoe in the middle of the lake, empty, it’s a problem. Typically, an empty canoe looks like this:

docked canoe

An empty canoe is docked. It’s going nowhere. While it’s not useless, you could say that an empty canoe doesn’t have much of a purpose. A canoe’s purpose comes into play with every person that boards it: Children, spouse, friends, siblings, students, and more. While it can be tiring to bear the weight of these people, I must admit that I’m honored. I don’t mind being partially submerged, stepped on, sat upon. I don’t mind being weighed down and directed. Without them, I’m going nowhere.

And I also know that without me, they aren’t going anywhere, either.

This morning, still a little down, I decided to re-read the talk, Behold Thy Mother, by Jeffery R. Holland, one of the current Twelve Apostles.

Anyone who is familiar with General Conference (A meeting for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints where we hear from a living prophet and apostles) knows that there are talks for women or about women/motherhood from time to time. I have to admit that I’ve always liked these talks. They encourage me. They motivate and inspire me.

However, I will admit that I’ve had this sneaking suspicion from time to time – are these talks just “pep talks?” Are they obligatory, “keep the women happy” talks?

This morning, I re-read Elder Holland’s talk, and I was reminded, this isn’t just some pep talk to tide me over until next conference. No. These talks are messages from God. The Lord knows that I am a canoe, and He is grateful for my decision to be this kind of a woman.

Elder Holland taught:

“Bear, borne, carry, deliver. These are powerful, heartening messianic words. They convey help and hope for safe movement from where we are to where we need to be—but cannot get without assistance. These words also connote burden, struggle, and fatigue—words most appropriate in describing the mission of Him who, at unspeakable cost, lifts us up when we have fallen, carries us forward when strength is gone, delivers us safely home when safety seems far beyond our reach. “My Father sent me,” He said, “that I might be lifted up upon the cross; … that as I have been lifted up … even so should men be lifted up … to … me.”

But can you hear in this language another arena of human endeavor in which we use words like bear and borne, carry and lift, labor and deliver? As Jesus said to John while in the very act of Atonement, so He says to us all, ‘Behold thy mother!'” – Jeffrey R. Holland

We women are all “canoes.” I don’t mean only mothers, either. I know other women who have born others up, strengthened them, and even delivered them. I’ve had these types of women in my life. Of course my own mother, I’ve had others, too. Kerri, Stephanie, Kara, Sister Chisholm, Vanessa, Chandra, Donna, Jocelyn, Hillary, Janay, Rachelle, Krista, Niki, Celeste, and sooo many more women. They have helped to bear me up and deliver me along when I’ve needed some support. At times, I’ve been a willing paddler, while they have acted as my canoe.

Elder Holland continues:

“You see, it is not only that they bear us, but they continue bearing with us. It is not only the prenatal carrying but the lifelong carrying that makes mothering such a staggering feat. Of course, there are heartbreaking exceptions, but most mothers know intuitively, instinctively that this is a sacred trust of the highest order. The weight of that realization, especially on young maternal shoulders, can be very daunting.

A wonderful young mother recently wrote to me: “How is it that a human being can love a child so deeply that you willingly give up a major portion of your freedom for it? How can mortal love be so strong that you voluntarily subject yourself to responsibility, vulnerability, anxiety, and heartache and just keep coming back for more of the same? What kind of mortal love can make you feel, once you have a child, that your life is never, ever your own again? Maternal love has to be divine. There is no other explanation for it. What mothers do is an essential element of Christ’s work. Knowing that should be enough to tell us the impact of such love will range between unbearable and transcendent, over and over again, until with the safety and salvation of the very last child on earth, we can [then] say with Jesus, ‘[Father!] I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do.’” – Jeffrey R. Holland

At first, last night, when I realized I was “the canoe,” I felt a quiet sadness wash over me. I thought of my roles as a woman: as someone who has given herself to her husband and children. Though I have done so willingly, last night I was feeling sorry for myself, wondering when it will be my turn to fulfill my own dreams and chart my own course. When will they support me?

Heavenly Father heard my frustrated prayer, and I was comforted in my heart, but I also felt a confirmation from the Spirit: Yes. You are a canoe. Yes, I’ve made sacrifices, and I will continue to do so. But the Lord would help me to understand more in the future.

As I said, I felt comfort wash over me, even though I was still a bit troubled at the thought of being a canoe. I decided I’d just be patient, go to sleep, and that I’d figure this out later.


This morning, as I read Elder Holland’s talk I felt confirmation of my thought last night. I am indeed a “canoe.” We women, who are choosing to righteously nurture those in our lives – our families, friends, and even strangers – we are canoes. It’s not particularly glamorous, but to the Lord and to the people in that boat it is valuable.

I am the canoe.